For our fourth and last podcast of the year, we are very happy to have Aviram Jenik, who has been involved in the fields of encryption, security vulnerabilities detection and research from the early days. Aviram is the founder of Beyond Security, a cyber security company that develops vulnerability assessment tools used by governments and companies worldwide to secure their networks, applications and hardware.

This interview is ~15 minutes, feel free to listen to it below or go ahead and read the edit. Enjoy!

Why did you decide to get involved in cyber security?
If I have to trace back what was probably the trigger for me, it would be a movie from the early 1990s, called Sneakers – about ethical hacker’s work. Ethical hackers doing social engineering and going into organizations to show them how they can hack in, pointing out the vulnerabilities, both physical and in computers. Of course at that time there was no internet, so if you had to hack a computer, you had to first get into the building. They were doing all of that and it was just awesome, so I watched it and thought: “wow how amazing would it be to do this for a living, to try to hack stuff or to find vulnerabilities in organizations by actually doing the attacks?”
So my really young self is looking at my old self and hopefully is really impressed, because that’s what we do today – ethical hacking, and I think that’s pretty awesome. That was maybe the seed that directed me toward cybersecurity, and specifically hacking.

What security trends or technologies get you excited or, alternatively, afraid of the future?
I’m really excited about getting rid of passwords; authentication is getting a lot better, much more than people realize. We’ve had a problem authenticating and preventing others from stealing passwords since the first login page, and it’s been a cat and mouse game ever since. But today it’s very difficult for someone to break in your phone, the FBI has a difficult time, yet it’s very easy for you to open it -you probably do it 50-100 times a day, for sure.
Think about that quantum leap: passwords were inconvenient to authenticate and the attacker had lots of ways to go around them. Today we are almost at the stage were one can easily authenticate against so many things, devices, and apps everyday, in a really reliable way. Soon we will get to a point were, just like we got rid of phone numbers, we are going to get rid of passwords, so that’s pretty exciting.

What gets me worried is how fast we are closing the distance gap. In the past, if you wanted to hack my car you would have to come physically close and do something in the car, or stand within close distance to try and duplicate the signal of my key. But today, you can hack my car from anywhere in the world, you can seat in a cyber café in Africa and hack my car in CA, now that’s scary. And its not just cars, but webcams, refrigerators, smart TVs, light bulbs, AC … and who knows what’s going to happen next, that is scary. That closing of the distance gap is scary. Because that means living in a safe neighborhood doesn’t mean anything anymore, because there is some bad guy in the world somewhere that can do bad stuff to me.

So tech is making our lives more convenient, but should we be paranoid about all these connected devices that we are bringing into our home?
Depends on who is “we”. If I’m a consumer, I would not be paranoid, at least not yet. I think we are still doing a reasonably good job at providing relatively secure consumer devices. There are attacks that we hear about, but they are not in a huge devastating scale yet, and we are doing a fair job at fixing them relatively quickly. Think about the recent Mac OS root password problem, that was fixed in 24 hours, so it doesn’t happen a lot and then we fix it quickly, so as an end user I wouldn’t be too paranoid.

On the other hand, as a vendor or if you are involved in security, be very paranoid – because if we screw up, the damages could be catastrophic. I’m old enough to remember the Y2K bug in 2000, back then nothing happened, but that kind of thing might happen again if we are not diligent about security. So if we miss something, some bad guy out there could take over a billion IoT devices around the world and maybe kill millions of people.

I’m not saying that to scare people, as vendors and security professionals, we have to make sure we are diligently keeping the internet safe, making sure devices are reasonably secure and fixing stuff quickly. So as a security professional, yes I’m definitely paranoid, as an end user – you know, I got all these digital gadgets, so I’m not paranoid.

What are some good cyber hygiene practices you would recommend to consumers?
Just like we try to find quality products whenever we buy electronics or things for our home., similar heuristics apply for security. Before bringing any product with a chip and connectivity into your home, try to find a brand with a good reputation, check for reviews online, think of worst-case scenarios if it got hacked, and act accordingly. I’m a little more comfortable if the device is from Google, Amazon or Apple, but if it’s an unnamed company from nowhere, I want to read the reviews. Don’t be paranoid about it, just think about those options, if you put a device that records your voice: what other things will it record? If you bring something with webcam ability: where will you place it?
By the way: being hacked is not the end of the world, right? Think about the worst-case scenarios, maybe it’s not so bad and that’s ok.